The text of the 1818 first edition of The Memoirs of Henry Obookiah, published in Hartford, Connecticut


First Section  Second Section


A collection of published accounts from the 19th century describing Opukaha’ia’s influence on the American Protestant missionary movement


Information about the plans of Ka ‘Ohe Ola Hou, an organization based in Hilo, Hawai’i working to perpetuate the memory and legacy of Opukaha’ia, holding him up as a positive role model for the people of Hawai’i.


An updated overview of Opukaha’ia’s life by Chris Cook, which was first distributed in Kailua-Kona in 1993 during events marking the return of his remains to Hawai’i.


Mark Twain’s description of being emotionally moved while studying the life of Opukaha’ia in Sunday school.


An account of the death of Captain Cook told by Opukaha’ia to his roommate in a Bradford, Massachusetts boarding house.

 

The most accessible source of information about Opukaha'ia is an edited edition of The Memoirs of Henry Obookiah published in 1968 by the Women' Board of Missions for the Pacific Islands, the Hawaii Conference, the United Church of Christ, Honolulu. That edition commemorated the 150th anniversary of Opukaha’ia's death. Additonal text by Albertine Loomis and Edith Wolfe, chapter notes and a number of photographs enhance the text.


Thanks to the efforts of the Lee family and the supporters of their organization Ahuhui O Opukaha'ia, Henry's remains were removed in the summer of 1993 from his burial site in Cornwall, Connecticut. Following a series of services in Honolulu and the Island of Hawai'i, his remains were interred at the peaceful churchyard of the Kahikolu Congregational Church in Kepulu (Napo'opo'o) overlooking Kealakekua Bay in the Kona District, Island of Hawai'i. That year the issue of Sovereignty for the Hawaiian people was a major topic, and the return of his remains was a timely reminder of the work of God in and through the Native Hawaiian people. In 1994, the 176th anniversary of Henry's death in Cornwall in 1818 from typhus fever was marked at the Kahikolu Church with the dedication of a new headstone and raised platform at his grave site. The service coincided with the first Christian Heritage Week in Hawai'i.


Third Edition - Hawai’i Statehood Edition 2009

First Edition Released February, 1994 on the occasion of  Hawai’i's First Christian Heritage Week

Second Edition Released 2006, for Hawai’i’s Christian Heritage Week


ALOHA KE AKUA


Contact: kitcook@gmail.com